Monday, 1 January 2018

Pictures from our Archives

These pictures, as with all the others on this Blog and on our 
are available as
Fine Art Prints, sometimes in two different formats,
always in small Limited Editions.

We've been noticing that some of the subjects currently popular on on-line 
art galleries are reflected in our archive of photographs and, in many cases, 
have not been looked at for years.
We found a couple that were particularly to our liking and quite different
in content.

The Ahmed Ibn Tulun Mosque in Cairo, 867 CE, which we visited many years ago when were on assignment in Egypt, is an ancient religious building
that made a great impression on us at the time.  We often wonder
why the design and structure of modern buildings so rarely compare with
the work of architects and builders hundreds, even a thousand, years ago. 
Not only are these ancient buildings more permanent and more agreeably
designed but they have atmosphere and are people-friendly.

And, for something completely different, we have noticed that prints of
holiday beaches have become very popular.  This one is not exactly
the beach but just at the edge of the beach in Nice, Côte d'Azur, France.
This picture is back to Georgina's minimalist approach which seems to
make it more interesting than a straightforward document.

We don't always find what we're looking for in our archive as easily as we'd hope.  Somewherewe have some interesting old images of the beach at Alexandria in Egypt
and it would be fun to work on those as, given the present interest in fashionable beaches, these would be ultimately counter-intuitive.

Thursday, 14 December 2017

A New Showcase

One of Georgina's most evocative images has just been selected as among
the 15 artists who have won a space in the 

Mixed Media Winners Video

created by Artists Info.

Here is the link to the video:

Vizzavona, Corsica.  Beeches in snow.
Prints of this image are available in two sizes:
A Limited Edition of 12 at 53cm x 53cm
A Limited Edition of 6 at 100cm x 100cm

Printed on heavyweight Fine Art Rag paper 310gsm using Canon's
archival pigment inks.

Numbered and Signed and with a Certificate of Authenticity.

Prints of this image are also offered for sale through online galleries that represent me:

In my opinion Corsica shares, with the West of Scotland, the distinction of being one of
the most atmospheric places on earth.  The Col de Vizzavona joins the North and South
parts of Corsica.  Coming over the pass one day in snow, I stopped to walk through the
beech woods near the road.  Perfect peace.  A relaxing simplicity and only about four
colours.  In the snow some of the trees were clinging to a few of their autumn leaves
like well-placed decorations.  I couldn't resist the temptation to simplify the view even
further and am intrigued by all the little 'creatures' and strange figures that, with a little
imagination, I can see among the trees.

Tuesday, 5 December 2017

New On-line Gallery

Georgina is now represented on another on-line gallery
and has been busy 
for the last week or so uploading work onto the site.

To see the work please visit:


Sunday, 5 November 2017

Latest Exhibition

We are also represented by Saatchi Art:

Note:  The exhibition has now been extended to the end of 
January 2018


Living in the Diois

We live in the Diois  -  la France Profonde.  Sometimes it's frustrating to live in 
an area so thinly populated and hence so far from many of the services and
luxuries that town dwellers take for granted.  Little choice for entertainment,
particularly eating out, limited medical facilities and few live cultural events.
But then, both as a discipline and as a pleasure, we justify one of our original reasons
for coming here by walking with a group of Châtillonais, (members of the
Association Fleurs & Fontaines), every Wednesday afternoon.
The walks have the multiple functions of reminding us that we live in some of the world's  most magnificent walking country, largely unspoiled, unpolluted and almost empty, that our
intentions to take regular long walks are too often thwarted by other commitments, but that, on Wednesday afternoon we must drop everything and go.  Last but not least the group's real purpose is to take secateurs and shears to keep the walking paths open.  The
benefits are obvious and help us to keep fit in body and soul.

In the past we have always preferred to walk on our own and we still do when we are looking for new subjects for our prints.  But the group is not merely a discipline but a
very agreeable one.  We learn a lot from the local people who know these mountains and
their history and know and can identify the plants and explain the geology and much more.
It's enriching and amusing and does a great deal to help us with the French language. 

The Diois is in the Drôme near to the border with the Isère Département.  It is an
administrative district surrounding the town of Die. Châtillon-en-Diois, where we live, is about 15 Km further into the unknown at the foot of the majestic cliffs of Glandasse
which is the southern tip of the Vercors Pleateau.  The climate is not quite Provençal but
very nearly.  We have plenty of sunshine all the year round with hot summers and sometimes quite cold winters, plenty of snow and plenty of seasonal variation.  The
wild life is fabulous and around the village we see wild boar, deer, foxes, badgers, three
species of vulture, eagles and other raptors, herons, snakes, gorgeous lizards, enormous toads and even wolves.  The list is endless.
Here are just a few glimpses of the country we walk in and the people we walk with.  They
are all very fit and keep us on our toes.

Serge Baude.  Our 'Chef'

The sun doesn't always shine

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

New Image on Saatchi Art

We are also represented by Saatchi Art.  Please visit:

Our Papua New Guinea prints on Saatchi Art are proving extremely 
popular and we have just added this image to the growing

This man on his way home in the rain sums up a lot of the characteristics
that we found so attractive about the New Guinea Highlanders when we lived 
there between 1970 and 1973.  

Normally calm and philosophical the Highlanders accepted strange and, at that time, relatively rare foreigners and their cameras despite having almost certainly never seen a
photograph of themselves.  If need be, they would climb into planes or
helicopters without any outward sign of doubt.  And yet they lived from the land
and found practical solutions to their day to day necessities, such as this interesting
use for a giant fig leaf umbrella.

To see more of our images please visit our website or Saatchi Art,
links above.